Go Swimming has everything you need to know about swimming. If you are a parent, a non swimmer or just want to improve your technique this is the section for you.

In British Swimming you will find information about the world of high performance sport, including the disciplines of Swimming, Diving, Synchronised Swimming, Water Polo and Para-Swimming.

The ASA is the governing body for the sport in England. In this section you will find all you need to know about joining a club or competing in England and becoming a swimming teacher or coach.

The IoS delivers the ASA’s courses and is a member organisation. Whether you are a teacher, coach, employer or club you will find everything you need to know about qualifications or educating your workforce.

Accessibility - Text Only - Display Options - Accessibility

Jamieson clocks British record in heats

Share this page

31st July 2012

Michael Jamieson clocked a British record to progress second fastest from the 200m Breaststroke heats on day four at the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Having set a Scottish record to finish ninth in the 100m Breaststroke earlier in the Games, the Brit paced his 200m heat perfectly to storm home in 2:08.98.

You’re always a bit apprehensive before the heats but I had a good swim in the 100m and that gave me a lot of confidence.

And having become the first Brit to duck under 2:09 over the distance, Jamieson insisted he hadn’t expected to make such an impact in the morning session.

“I’m pretty happy with it,” said Jamieson – having broken former teammate Kris Gilchrist’s old British marker of 2:09.01.

“I’m a bit surprised about the time as well to be honest. You’re always a bit apprehensive before the heats but I had a good swim in the 100m and that gave me a lot of confidence.

“This morning I was in that first seeded heat so it was difficult to know what time I needed and I had to go and set a marker.

“Fingers crossed I’ve got a little bit more to give tonight.”

Jamieson’s training partner Andrew Willis was not to be outdone and won his heat, defeating defending Olympic champion Kosuke Kitajima in the process, to progress third fastest.

Looking at the heat times before mine, it was tough out there.

The 21-year old equaled his English record 2:09.33 to qualify and admitted he didn't want to take any chances in booking his semi-final spot.

"I'm really happy with that for a morning swim," said Willis. "Looking at the heat times before mine, it was tough out there.

"I knew I would have to do about 2:10 to come back tonight so I wasn't going to mess around.

"I'm just trying to get through each round so I've got to switch off now and come back strong for the semi tonight."

Jemma Lowe underlined her medal potential to qualify third fastest from the 200m Butterfly heats.

I'm happy to have it to the next round - that was the only aim for me today.

The Welsh record holder – who qualified fastest for last year’s World Championship final before coming seventh – finished second in her heat, touching in 2:07.64 to progress.

“I'm really happy to have made it to the next round," said Lowe. "That was the only aim for me today.

"It's been hard for me these past few days because I'm normally used to racing the 100m Fly and it's been hard watching everyone else getting in there and race.

"So I'm happy I've got that first one done. It was a good result and the best time I've done in a morning. I didn't really know what to expect so I'm happy."

Ellen Gandy finished an agonising 17th in the heats, missing out on the semi-finals by 0.59 seconds after touching fifth in her heat in 2:09.92.

But having finished eighth in the 100m Fly, the World silver medallist was at a loss to explain her below-par showing.

"I felt fine for the first 100," said Gandy. "But in the second part I don't know what happened. I felt like I'd been hit by a bus."

The British 4x200m Freestyle Relay quartet of David Carry, Ross Davenport, Rob Bale and Robbie Renwick produced a grandstand finish to the session as they qualified for tonight’s final.

The Brits surged through to finish second in their heat, touching in 7:10.70 to progress fifth fastest.

"We're in the final now, we're in a good position with a good lane," said Davenport. "We've knocked a few teams out who we thought would potentially be a threat.

"Essentially that's what the heats are all about and we can certainly raise our game in the final and push other teams all the way."

Adam Brown narrowly missed out on a 100m Freestyle semi-final spot with his first appearance of London 2012.

The 23-year old prefers the shorter 50m Free but improved on his result from last year’s World Championships to finish 20th overall in 49.20.

Related Articles

Useful?

© 2014 British Swimming & The ASA. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy