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In British Swimming you will find information about the world of high performance sport, including the disciplines of Swimming, Diving, Synchronised Swimming, Water Polo and Para-Swimming.

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About Water Polo

Water polo is an incredibly physical game. Find out below why the sport is regarded as one of the most demanding of all team games.

Water polo is a fast-paced sport played by two teams in a swimming pool. There are goals at each end of the pool and, similar to other sports such as football, the winner of the game is the team that scores the most goals by getting the ball between the posts.

Each team is allowed to have seven players in the water at any one time (six ‘out-field’ players and a goalkeeper). Other than the goalkeeper, you will see the other players moving continuously around the pool.

They are not allowed to touch the bottom of the pool and must tread water the entire time - although players use a movement called the egg-beater which is more efficient than the normal action of treading water.

Players can move the ball by throwing it to a teammate or swimming while pushing the ball in front of them. They can only hold the ball with one hand, other than the goalkeeper who can use both hands.

A water polo player can cover up to three kilometres in a gameWater polo players need remarkable stamina because of the considerable amount of holding and pushing that occurs during the game. Because it’s such a fast game and can be quite draining, each team is also allowed a maximum of six substitutes. 

Under FINA rules, a water polo match is divided into quarters. Each of the four periods is eight minutes long but because the clock is stopped when the ball is not 'in play' in real life the average quarter lasts around 12 minutes.

Each team is only allowed to hold onto the ball for a maximum of 30 seconds before shooting for the goal. If they haven’t done this then possession passes to the other team.

  • For the rules on low level competition click here.
  • To find out the full set of senior rules, how they are interpreted and applied to the game click here.

A physical sport

Water polo is often seen as a physical sport as players jockey for position or aim to knock away or steal the ball from the other team. 

Deliberately kicking or hitting an opponent with the intent to injure is against the rules, but sometimes players will commit a foul in order to stop a player shooting for goal or getting into space.

Players will also try and stop other players even if they haven’t got the ball. They may try to grab their opponent’s shoulders, back or legs. This is also a foul.

A player caught committing a major foul is asked to leave the pool for 20 seconds. A major foul includes sinking (dunking) a player, swimming on another player's back or trying to stop the other player from swimming.

Once asked to leave the pool a player who has committed a major foul may return sooner if a goal is scored or his team regains possession. If a player commits a major foul three times they must sit out the whole match.

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