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In British Swimming you will find information about the world of high performance sport, including the disciplines of Swimming, Diving, Synchronised Swimming, Water Polo and Para-Swimming.

The ASA is the governing body for the sport in England. In this section you will find all you need to know about joining a club or competing in England and becoming a swimming teacher or coach.

The IoS delivers the ASA’s courses and is a member organisation. Whether you are a teacher, coach, employer or club you will find everything you need to know about qualifications or educating your workforce.

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Swimfit Training Camp: Kicking the habit

Swimfit Training Camp: Kicking the habit

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Whether you swim at a health club, private pool or public leisure centre, you’ll struggle to find a pool without an array of equipment helpfully strewn around pool deck.

From your standard floats and kickboards to the more elaborate fins and paddles, there is equipment to isolate every different part of your stroke.

But while the equipment is there, rarely do you find a waterproof instruction manual or training guide alongside to make sure you’re using it correctly.

But the good news is, including basic equipment to improve your technique doesn’t have to be complicated and it’s a great way to add a bit of variety to your session.

Kick Boards

  • While they’re by far the most common float found poolside, kick boards actually aren’t the most effective of floats for the learner swimmer.
  • When the swimmer keeps their head raised and holds a kick board out in front of them, it creates a dip in their spine, reducing all the hard work done on maintaining body position, and encourages you to put weight on it.
  • Instead, hold the kick board by the very end with your arms outstretched and kick with your face underwater, lifting your head slightly when you need to breathe.
  • This will encourage a straight body position and also get you used to having your face underwater – essential for swimming more efficiently.

Pull Buoys

  • It is commonly perceived that swimming with a pull buoy is to purely create an arm focus.
  • However, by swimming with a pull buoy in between your thighs, your lower half will immediately be raised, meaning that while you will not swim faster, you will swim easier as the pull buoy reduces resistance and helps your balance.
  • Of course, it does help you improve your arm technique so aim to focus on your hand entry and other aspects of your arm stroke while you’re using the float.
  • If you want to strengthen your arms further, add a pair of paddles or a band to the mix to create resistance pull.

Further Reading

  1. Check out British Gas Swimfit's in-depth guide to swimming training guides in our Tools of the Trade section.
  2. If you're isolating your freestyle kick or arm action to improve technique, make sure you're getting the technique right as well by taking a look at our Advanced Technique Videos.
  3. Leave a comment below or head to Ask an Expert with a specific question about your swimming fears.

Useful?

Go Swimming has everything you need to know about swimming. If you are a parent, a non swimmer or just want to improve your technique this is the section for you.

In British Swimming you will find information about the world of high performance sport, including the disciplines of Swimming, Diving, Synchronised Swimming, Water Polo and Para-Swimming.

The ASA is the governing body for the sport in England. In this section you will find all you need to know about joining a club or competing in England and becoming a swimming teacher or coach.

The IoS delivers the ASA’s courses and is a member organisation. Whether you are a teacher, coach, employer or club you will find everything you need to know about qualifications or educating your workforce.

Accessibility - Text Only - Display Options - Accessibility

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