Go Swimming has everything you need to know about swimming. If you are a parent, a non swimmer or just want to improve your technique this is the section for you.

In British Swimming you will find information about the world of high performance sport, including the disciplines of Swimming, Diving, Synchronised Swimming, Water Polo and Para-Swimming.

The ASA is the governing body for the sport in England. In this section you will find all you need to know about joining a club or competing in England and becoming a swimming teacher or coach.

The IoS delivers the ASA’s courses and is a member organisation. Whether you are a teacher, coach, employer or club you will find everything you need to know about qualifications or educating your workforce.

Accessibility - Text Only - Display Options - Accessibility

This content is old and no longer maintained. For the latest articles, advice and more go to Go Swimming.

A day at the beach

Share this page

The sea, lakes and rivers can be great places to have fun in the water, but they also hold a lot of dangers. Water can be colder, for example, and make you tired more quickly. And as Jasmine finds out below, currents can drag you away from safety. And in real life there may not be a lifeguard around the corner.

Video Playback Unavailable

So, you get a text from one of your friends: "r u gna beach?" Of course you are going to the beach! It’s hot, your MP3 player is packed with the latest downloads and you want to show everyone how good you look in your new swimwear.

When you arrive your friends are already in the sea. Some are throwing a frisbee near the shore, while others are busy diving through the waves. But where is Jasmine, your best friend? She was the one who texted you, after all.

You shout out. "She was here a minute ago," says Billy as he dodges a frisbee. Everyone suddenly looks worried. They start shouting her name. There is no response. You start to scramble to the top of a sand dune for a better view of the sea.

In the distance you can just make out a waving arm before it falls below the surface again. You dial 999 and ask for the lifeguard. Luckily there is one the next beach down and Jasmine is saved before she drowns.

Because you knew what to do, your best friend didn't become one of the 450-500 people who drown in the UK every year. Of course, this is only a story. But ask yourself: If your real best friend were drowning, would you know what to do?

The sea, lakes and rivers can be great places to have fun in the water, but they also hold a lot of dangers. Water can be colder, for example, and make you tired more quickly. And as Jasmine found, currents can drag you away from safety. And in real life there may not be a lifeguard around the corner.

But despite the dangers you can still enjoy the water. Just be prepared and sensible. To learn more about spotting the danger signs, general safety advice, and for information on how to train as a lifeguard, click on the links below.

Keeping safe in the water

How to become a Life Saver

The lowdown on beach safety

Go Swimming has everything you need to know about swimming. If you are a parent, a non swimmer or just want to improve your technique this is the section for you.

In British Swimming you will find information about the world of high performance sport, including the disciplines of Swimming, Diving, Synchronised Swimming, Water Polo and Para-Swimming.

The ASA is the governing body for the sport in England. In this section you will find all you need to know about joining a club or competing in England and becoming a swimming teacher or coach.

The IoS delivers the ASA’s courses and is a member organisation. Whether you are a teacher, coach, employer or club you will find everything you need to know about qualifications or educating your workforce.

Accessibility - Text Only - Display Options - Accessibility

© 2014 British Swimming & The ASA. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy