New working group to improve school swimming

improving_school_swimming

The ASA has welcomed government’s commitment to improve school swimming with the establishment of a working group to explore issues around delivery and attainment.

The commitment to ensure that every child leaves primary school able to swim was included in the new sport strategy, Sporting Future: A New Strategy for an Active Nation, released today by the Sports Minister, Tracey Crouch.

Jon Glenn, Head of Learn to Swim at the ASA, said: “We are delighted to see school swimming referenced so strongly in the new government Sports Strategy.

“Only 52 per cent of primary school children are able to swim the national curriculum requirement of a minimum of 25 metres unaided. We have to change this, which is why the ASA fully supports the establishment of a working group to look at the challenges schools face in the delivery of curriculum swimming.

“With the support of government we have a great opportunity to make a significant impact in the way that school swimming is perceived and delivered. By working in partnership with strategic swimming partners we can ensure that every child leaves primary school being able to swim.”

The strategy states that the government will “commit to ensuring that every child leaves primary school able to swim” and explains how it will do this:

“Government will establish a working group to advise on how to ensure no child leaves school unable to meet a minimum standard of capability and confidence in swimming, including disabled young people and those with Special Educational Needs. The group will consider what confidence and capability really mean in swimming, what challenges schools face in providing quality swimming tuition, how swimming is delivered in a way that caters for all children, and what government and others can do to tackle these issues. The working group will be established in early 2016 and will report by the end of the year.”

Read the full sport strategy on the DCMS website.

 

Useful?

website: Skylab