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Michael Jamieson’s top tips for a champion swim

Michael Jamieson’s top tips for a champion swim

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Breaststroke is one of the first strokes we learn when taking to the water, but are you making swimming harder for yourself than it needs to be?

Olympan Michael Jamieson gripped the nation at the London 2012 Games with his thrilling silver medal in the 200m Breaststroke event.

The Glasgow-born swimmer, who trains in Bath with coach Graeme Antwhistle, has mastered the art of breaststroke technique over years of hard work and dedication.

His effortless stroke and speed are second to none, so who better to learn from. If you want to swim better breaststroke then here are some tips from Michael to help you on your way.

SwimTip: click here to check out stroke improvement videos for more better breaststroke tips

Strong leg kick

  • Propulsion from your legs is the most important part of the breaststroke motion, so kick as hard as you can to drive yourself forward.
  • Always finish the kick action completely – snap you toes and ankles as your legs are outstretched behind you. Do not cut your leg action short!
  • When in the glide position, keep as streamlined as you can lying parallel to the water surface to minimise drag and get the most out of each leg kick. Keep your body as tube-like as possible!

Arm action

  • Try to keep your arm pull as narrow as you can by drawing your arms up the centreline of your body and throwing them forward in an arrow-shape.
  • Snap your arms through during the recovery phase to minimise the loss of momentum from the leg kick.
  • When plunging forward into the glide position, keep your arms in a tight streamline by locking your hands together and squeezing your elbows tightly to your ears.

Breathing

  • Breathing efficiently is an essential part of swimming any stroke. Try improving your cardiovascular fitness by running and cycling to increase your oxygen intake per breath.
  • When in the pool, always exhale all the air in your lungs before taking your next breath to ensure the maximum amount of oxygen is getting to your blood stream.

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Go Swimming has everything you need to know about swimming. If you are a parent, a non swimmer or just want to improve your technique this is the section for you.

In British Swimming you will find information about the world of high performance sport, including the disciplines of Swimming, Diving, Synchronised Swimming, Water Polo and Para-Swimming.

The ASA is the governing body for the sport in England. In this section you will find all you need to know about joining a club or competing in England and becoming a swimming teacher or coach.

The IoS delivers the ASA’s courses and is a member organisation. Whether you are a teacher, coach, employer or club you will find everything you need to know about qualifications or educating your workforce.

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