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The Kellogg’s ASA Swimtastic Awards 2012 countdown - Thursday

18th October 2012

The countdown is on for the annual Kelloggs ASA Swimtastic Awards 2012 so let’s take a closer look at the last of our finalists.

The countdown is on for the Kellogg’s ASA Swimtastic Awards 2012 taking place at Ponds Forge, Sheffield, 20th October.  We take a look at our final two categories and their finalists for this Saturdays award ceremony, The Young Swimmer Award and The Disability swimmer of the year.

Each one of our finalists has shown sheer determination, courage and commitment to the swimming world.

The Young Swimmer Award

This award recognises someone who shows particular promise in the pool at a young age and has achieved a high standard of swimming already.

 

Oliver Saunders, age 7, from Frome, Somerset

  • Oliver learned to swim from the age of three and has flabbergasted everyone who knows him since! Oliver has exceeded his family’s expectations, when at the age of five he managed to swim 17 lengths of 25m in one session. Shortly after, Oliver’s stamina got him an invitation to compete in a distance night, swimming alongside children much older than him. Oliver swam continuously for an hour and a half and completed 70 lengths of the pool.
  • Oliver’s swimming went from strength to strength and his technical ability meant he had a full repertoire of strokes by age six.
  • Oliver then took on the Aspire Swim Challenge (the distance of the English Channel - in 12 weeks in their local pool), Oliver completed 22 miles (1416 lengths). He became the youngest boy ever to complete the challenge and was delighted to get his first swimming record while raising over £1100 to help people with spinal injuries.

Eden Joy Light, age 12 from Ulverston, Cumbria

  • Eden’s story began with a girl called Alice Pyne who lives in the same town as Eden. Alice has terminal Hodgkins Lymphoma. Alice and her family have set up a charity called Alices Escapes to enable families with very ill children to stay in the Lake District and spend quality time together.
  • It was in June 2012 that Eden came home from school one day and announced that she was going to do a sponsored swim for Alice. Eden phoned the local leisure centre and arranged to have use of one lane to do her swim.
  • Eden is still a regular fundraiser for Alices Escapes and continues to put in her efforts to raise money for her friend Alice.

Cerys Esslemont, age 6, from Corby, Northamptonshire

  • Cerys joined the swim group ducklings to mark the opening of Corby’s International pool. She completed all her duckling stages at an early age and was forwarded onto stages 1 to 7. As Cerys’ achievements grew in the pool, so did her confidence and happiness, constructing class demonstrations and swimming with peers twice her age at just five years old.
  • Cerys was offered a place on the Corby squad team, however has chosen to wait for availability to undertake the opportunity of training to become a Rookie Lifeguard. Cerys believes it is important to learn how to save others, as she had experience of getting into difficulties whilst on holiday in July 2010 and thankfully was saved by a passerby.
  • Cerys now promotes water safety and swim awareness to others undertaking swimming lessons in the club.

 

The Disability swimmer of the year award

This award is for a swimmer who has overcome a disability and continues to develop their swimming, achieving high standards throughout the year. They may have gained a particular award this year or been successful in challenges or compeititons.

Finalist: Jessica Swales

Age: 9 Lives: Bristol

Despite her age, this young athlete shows the dedication and tenacity of a person many years her senior.

Jessica suffers from cystic fibrosis and must juggle a routine of 25 pills per day and regular hospital checkups to maintain her health. However, this does not stop the nine year old training four times a week, including early morning session before school!

After struggling with a string of illnesses over the past few years, Jessica achieved her 1,500m badge and her Gold Kelloggs Award; she aims to progress to her 2,000m badge later this year.

 

Finalist: Kylian Sampson

Age: 7 Lives: Devon

Kylian was bornsuffering from Autistic Spectrum Disorder and Cerebral Palsy but despite not being able to swim and never being in water out of his depth, his playful, happy character and love and enthusiasm for the water were immediately obvious.

Considering his disabilities, he showed no apprehension for the water and overcame the negative sensations of wearing a swimming hat and goggles. He is determined and committed and despite frequent problems with discomfort in his foot and legs, Kylian never misses a training session.

Kylian has not only learnt to swim confidently he has also achieved an array of awards including the ASA National Plan for Teaching Swimming Awards Levels 1, 2 and 3, Water Skills Awards level 1 and 2, the Preliminary Safety Award and has achieved his 100m distance badge.

 

Finalist: Katie Beavington

Age: 8 Lives: Essex

Katie was born with a rare disorder called Fibula Deficiency, which means she no longer has no lower bones in her right leg and only a small foot. When she was three years old, her foot was amputated to allow a prosthetic leg to be fitted enabling Katie to walk more easily.

At the age of five, Katie took up swimming as it is a non-weight bearing sport and would allow her to get regular exercise with little discomfort. However, her prosthetic leg is rigid and therefore made swimming very hard work.

Katie is now practising swimming without her prosthetic leg and has joined a disabled swimming club at Wickford pool. Katie is a happy and enthusiastic girl and her coach describes her as a ‘pleasure to teach’.

 

Good luck to all our finalists this Saturday!

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